Turn 3 results
#11
The scenario "Envelopment" is an unfortunate one, but it also offers the Defender an opportunity to learn to use tactics, positioning and strategy to either prevent or at least make life very hard for the attacker to waltz in on turn 5 and waltz straight off again. Ambush, positioning of a unit to force the enemy to come on further down the table, strong reserve unit, perhaps other ideas can be tried out.

An example from my second game (admittedly Demolition, not Envelopment, but same principle): Aaron had positioned a PaK 40 defending his strongpoint and covering the left flank. This made me very reluctant to bring on my Crocodile anywhere there because of the +6 pen bonus from the gun. Do something like that with a powerful unit in ambush and you make the attacker think harder about how his unit is going to come on board without getting at least a bit of a mincing!

Just my tuppenceworth from playing a few Envelopment games recently.

W.
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#12
Even better if you are defending and have a flame tank sitting in ambush lol.

I am thinking that not bothering to attack the units that he starts on board, let them come to you. Instead position yourself covering both flanks and sit on ambush.
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#13
(10-20-2014, 10:21 PM)Roger Campbell Wrote: Even better if you are defending and have a flame tank sitting in ambush lol.

I am thinking that not bothering to attack the units that he starts on board, let them come to you. Instead position yourself covering both flanks and sit on ambush.

That's pretty much what happened in my game against Alan. I was attacking, and hit a number of his units with Preparatory Bombardment pins. As I was mostly out of range in Turn One he spent most of the Order Dice as Rally attempts, which meant he was much more "prepared" for when the attack launched properly, plus he was able to have units covering the flanks which meant I had to deal with them before I could make the breakthrough.


WR
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#14
Does it bode well for the tournament, will whoever rolls highest and takes 'attacker' leave most of his force outflanking and hope he is successful on his leadership tests in turn 5/6?

That could be the most gratuitous waste of time ever, for the defender, if he is a yank just waltz two observers on and pin everything in turns 3/4, meanwhile opponent is ready to strangle you as he had no chance to do anything.

Not a supreme test of tactics by any stretch.
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#15
A bit of forethought needs to go into this scenario, David, especially if you're defending. Dave Warrillow and I spent three separate gaming evenings working on it to see if there were any special tricks we could come up with to help out against this "Drive On And Disappear Into The Sunset" method.

It's certainly something that will need specific ruling on for the next tournament, but for this one it's going to be a case of "out-think your opponent", I reckon. Certainly the Attacker has the major advantage in Envelopment, especially if he plays British as they get to roll two dice on each enemy unit with Prep Bombardment, taking the highest result each time. I forgot this in my game against Alan and still pinned the hell out of half his units.

There is of course a simple answer for the TOs on the day, and that is to announce before the Envelopment scenario game that Drive-On/Drive-Off is not permitted.

Roger
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#16
No rules will be changed at this late stage unfortunately. As I said its warts and all with a Q+A afterwards for the next tournament.

I would say that on envelopment tactics on the defenders behalf would be more important not less.
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#17
(10-22-2014, 12:04 PM)Roger Campbell Wrote: No rules will be changed at this late stage unfortunately. As I said its warts and all with a Q+A afterwards for the next tournament.

I would say that on envelopment tactics on the defenders behalf would be more important not less.

The whole point of this tournament was to find out the warts and then do something about them for the next tourney from what I understand, and yep - defender needs to think about what he's going to do in Envelopment. Big Grin
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#18
An A/T gun or even a bloke with a panzerfaust on ambush will do it. i.e. someone belts on with a transport (soft skinned or armour 7 usually). Shot kills the transport doing pins and d6 wounds to any units inside who if they survive auto go down. There are a few other tactics as well. It will come down to 1 or 2 dice rolls but most games can swing on that anyway.

Also make sure your opponent writes down for each unit which side he is outflanking from and when he decides to come on ask to see it
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#19
(10-22-2014, 01:45 PM)Roger Campbell Wrote: Also make sure your opponent writes down for each unit which side he is outflanking from and when he decides to come on ask to see it

Very good point, Roger. The other element to that is that your opponent MUST tell you which units are outflanking during set-up (P.119 line 3 of Outflanking manoeuvre). He also according to the rules MUST reveal his written instructions, but here's an interesting part to this: he must do this
Quote:"only when the first outflanking force arrives on the table"

This has two meanings: 1) he only has to do it once for that unit alone, or 2) he has to reveal ALL units at this point. The RAI surely is that you prove to your opponent that the outflanking unit is coming on from its written side when it arrives, and that you do this *per* unit? Otherwise the opponent will be either hyper well informed about the other units, or else will remain in the dark for the remaining units, which is against the rules.

Hmmm. Could have been written slightly better, yes?

WR
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#20
Only Bill vs Brian left
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